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20120926
20121004
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
's office politics. >> this is an interview that was 100% about education policy. so i really had to do my homework. if you are going to try to ask questions of somebody who has been dealing with, and administering education policy for basically the last four years, i tried to do a little bit of homework. so that was the hardest part, probably. the second hardest part is more logistical. when you interview the president, or a presidential candidate, they usually give you a very short amount of time. in this case, i think we had 15 minutes. and you'd be surprised, you may not, but most people would be surprised how quickly that goes. i mean, that's really just four or five questions, depending on how lengthy the answers are. now, i did go a little over the time limit. i ended up going 20 to 22 minutes. >> so how does he end it? does somebody come in and say we're done? >> it's a funny little behind-the-scenes thing. sometimes, i think it's just known that you'll go a little bit past the time limit. the white house understands that. we understand that. you can do it within reason. so when i
-sex marriage once same-sex marriage had already been offered in california. >> higher education admissions. at the heart of this case, abgait fisher, because fisher says she was denied to the university of texas because she is white. what factors would affect their ruling? >> the court has ruled before that diversity is a compelling government interest. the government in other words has an interest, universities have an interest in compiling diverse classes of students, that diversity helps everyone and that they can look at an applicants's race in making some of those decisions. the court has changed since that last decision, that decision was written for instance by justice o'connor. some of the current justices are much less accepting of racial classification. >> the voting rights act of 1965, what part is at issue and why? >> this is a part that says certain states with a history of discriticism nation, most of them are in the south, they have to have any changes they make to election laws approved by federal authorities, either by the attorney general, or by a panel of freshmederal ju
are huge, not just education which we just did, but of course the economy. now we see foreign policy becoming more a part of the election. so i think it's fascinating to cover a presidential election. >> sure. >> it's a privilege. and i think for us i'm sure that's one of the reasons you got into journalism. it's certainly one of the reasons i did. >> absolutely. another element of that election, though, was the sarah palin factor which you covered. what was that like? >> i covered sarah palin almost from the very beginning. my bosses called me and said, you know what, get to alaska. we want you to be in alaska by the time sarah palin delivers her address to the republican national convention, which was that following week. and from that point forward, i was covering sarah palin. she came back to alaska on her campaign plane. at that point i jumped on and we flew around for the next whatever it was, couple months. it was a very interesting time, and interesting story. here's somebody who is so new to the national scene. but i will say, and this is something that sarah palin has talke
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)

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